Thursday, March 5, 2015

Andy is a mosaic of disabilities, time will tell what's in store for your child

I just wanted to point out that Andy doesn't only have a thin corpus callosum, or only microcephaly. Andy has layers of problems with his underdeveloped brain that go deep into his DNA. I am saying this because I notice parents are searching out "thin corpus callosum" on the internet, and perhaps getting this blog. I just want to reassure you that there are tons of kids with only a thin corpus callosum that do really well. There is a wide spectrum of things that can happen for kids with microcephaly, and developmental delays. Things can be mild or severe with any diagnosis it is impossible to predict where your child will fall.

I don't want to worry any frantic parents searching the internet that my son is what your infant with agenesis of corpus callous will look like. The truth is, no one can really tell you what your child's possibilities will be. It is the toughest most cruel and challenging waiting game EVER.

For years, it's been torture, but I've come to terms with everything now. My son's major area of concern now is the microdeletion he has within his DNA. He is missing two major genes that are most likely causing him the inability to learn like normal kids do. He also demonstrates autistic behaviors, along with high irritability, which a neurologist explained was probably from the corpus callosum not being fully connected.

His brain is very underdeveloped and he has low amounts of white matter. All variables are extremely stacked against him. However, he is blessed, in that he can eat food, he can laugh and squeal, army crawl after toys, and use his hands to get them. He is even now able to open and close his toy computer on his own. A year ago, I'd have never thought he could do this.

It is good to see what might lie ahead, to brace yourself for it, but I really haven't seen any two kids alike on the internet yet. Kids surprise you, and my son has surprised me. It has taken so many years to see so little progress, but I'll take it.

We are blessed that he is so happy now, and he enjoys life. He has so much joy, so I have stopped feeling so bad for him, because he is happy. He doesn't know any different. He doesn't know what he might be missing. He has friends that love him and really enjoy being around him. He has his own little life and people other than his family that truly care about him.

He's a charmer. He has his own little personality. He's so innocent. He wouldn't hurt anyone ever, and doesn't even know how to. He is a kind soul, and enjoys being around other kids. Certain things make him laugh, and he really laughs out loud. He loves music, it makes him so happy, and calms him when he's upset.

He's got his own destiny, and I'm here to care for him. I've finally allowed myself to have my own life, and he has his. All the major ups and downs will slowly level out for you with time. It just takes time.

1 comment:

  1. Glad to meet you! I also have a 9-year old daughter with special needs. She has intellectual disability, seizure disorder, hypotonia, among many other things. I just wanted to reach out and say hello, you're definitely not alone on your journey. I love what you said-- that you've finally allowed yourself to have your own life, and he has his. That's the perfect way to think...as long as you do whatever you can for him, I'm sure you already are- you guys will make it through as I will, with my daughter. Hope we can be bloggy friends! :)

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